Mortgage Calculator

Use our mortgage calculator to estimate your monthly mortgage payment. You can input a different home price, down payment, loan term and interest rate to see how your monthly payment changes.

Our monthly payment estimates are broken down by principal and interest, property taxes and homeowners insurance. We take our calculator a step further by factoring in your credit score range, zip code and HOA fees to give you a more precise payment estimate. You’ll also go into the home-buying process with a more accurate picture of how to calculate mortgage payments and purchase with confidence. After you run some estimates, read on for more education and home-buying tips.

Your estimated
monthly payment

Purchase Price

Go
 STEP 1
Enter the price of the home you're interested in and press GO.
Land Transfer Tax: $-
Provincial: Provincial Land transfer tax (LTT), typically calculated as a percentage of the purchase price of a home, is required when purchasing a home in Canada. All provinces have a LTT, and the amount varies in each province. plus
Municipal: Municipal Some municipalities, like Toronto, levy an additional LTT, which is similarly calculated as a percentage of the purchase price of a home. plus
Rebate: Rebate If you are a first-time home buyer in British Columbia or Ontario, you will be eligible for LTT rebates, equal to the value of the LTT up to a maximum amount set by the province. minus
 
STEP 4
If necessary, update your profile to calculate land transfer tax.
Down payment Down payment The amount of money you pay up front to obtain a mortgage. The minimum down payment in Canada is 5%. For down payments of less than 20%, home buyers are required to purchase mortgage default insurance, commonly referred to as CMHC insurance.
minus
Mortgage insurance Mortgage insurance Mortgage default insurance, commonly referred to as CMHC insurance, protects the lender in the case the borrower defaults on the mortgage. Mortgage default insurance is required on all mortgages with down payments of less than 20%, which are known as high ratio mortgages. Mortgage default insurance is calculated as a percentage applied to your mortgage amount. plus
(PST)
Total Mortgage Requiredequals$-$-$-$-
Amortization period Amortization period The length of time it will take a homeowner to pay off his/her mortgage. In Canada, the maximum amortization period for insurable mortgages is 25 years. Longer amortization periods allow homeowners to make smaller monthly payments, but equate to more interest paid over the life of the mortgage.  
 
STEP 2
Choose an amortization period.
Mortgage rate Mortgage rate The rate of interest you will pay on the outstanding balance of your mortgage. This is determined by the mortgage type and mortgage provider. To see how rates vary by type and provider, click on "Select Rate" link on the right.  
 
 STEP 3
Choose a mortgage rate to calculate the corresponding payment.
Mortgage type Mortgage type The mortgage type includes the term of the mortgage, between 1-10 years, and the rate type, variable or fixed. The mortgage term is the length of time you commit to the terms, conditions and mortgage rate with a specific lender. The mortgage rate type can be fixed for the duration of the term or variable, fluctuating with the prime rate. Fixed rates are most popular in Canada and represent 66% of all mortgages, according to the Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals (CAAMP).      

Total Mortgage Payment

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Get rate
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Get rate
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Get rate
Mortgage payment The monthly mortgage payment is calculated based on the inputs you provided: the mortgage amount, rate type (fixed or variable), term, amortization period, and payment frequency. A general affordability rule, as outlined by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, is that your monthly housing costs should not exceed 32% of your gross household monthly income.  
Explore the drop-downs to better understand your mortgage choice.

Fund Required
How much extra cash will I need when my house closes?

When you purchase a house, there are a number of costs you'll need to put cash aside for in addition to your down payment. These costs depend on a number of factors including things like what kind of home you are buying (i.e. house vs. condo) and where the home is located.

Our tool will help you calculate these costs, so you know how much you'll need to save.

Required Cash Expenditures

  • Down payment $-
  • PST on mortgage insurance $-
  • Land Transfer Tax $-
  • Lawyer fees $-
  • Title insurance $-
  • Estoppel certificate fee $-
  • Total Cash Required $-

Other Cash Considerations

  • Home inspection fees $300 - $500
  • Appraisal fees $300

Monthly Payment
Can I afford my monthly payment & mortgage payments?

Expenses

  • Mortgage payment $-
  • Property Tax
  • Monthly Debt Payments
  • Utilities
  • Condo Fees
  • Property insurance
  • Phone
  • Cable
  • Internet
  • Total $-

Interest Rate Risk
What would my payment be at higher interest rates?

When determining the size of home you can afford, it's important to look at the long term horizon. The mortgage rate you pay today could be substantially different from the mortgage rates available when the time comes to renew your mortgage.

The calculation below shows how much of your mortgage principal will be left at the end of the term.

Mortgage Amount

  • Mortgage amount today $-
  • Less: Principal paid off over term $-
  • End of the term balance: $-

Using this amount, below we calculate the corresponding mortgage payments at a variety of interest rates:

Purchase interest ratePayment
Selected Scenario
Selected Rate$-
Average 5-year Fixed Rates (2000 - 2010)3.89%$-
Average 5-year Fixed Rates (1990 - 2000)7.23%$-
Average 5-year Fixed Rates (1980 - 1990)11.92%$-

Below is a graph that displays the approximate values of competitive 5-year fixed mortgage rates since 2006.

5-year Fixed Mortgage Rates

Amortization Schedule
What do my payments look like over time?

YearTotal PaidPrincipal PaidInterest PaidBalance

Select rate

ProviderRateSelect
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Custom rateSelect

Find a rate and a monthly payment
that fits your budget

We’ve matched your selections with top mortgages in our lender network. The estimated monthly payment includes interest, insurance, and taxes. Not seeing what you want? Try adjusting your answers, or view other options.

APR: 3.94%

Rate Hold120 Days (Apr 12)
Lump Prepayments20%
Payment Increase20%
Double-up PaymentsNo
Permitted Loan-to-ValueUp to 95%
Pre-approvalsYes
Provider TypeBank
Provinces ServedAB,BC,ON
Visit Provider

APR: 7.25%

Rate Hold130 Days (Apr 22)
Lump Prepayments100%
Payment Increase20%
Double-up PaymentsNo
Permitted Loan-to-ValueUp to 95%
Pre-approvalsYes
Provider TypeBank
Provinces ServedNational
Visit Provider
First Calgary Financial

APR: 6.6%

First Calgary Financial

Rate Hold90 Days (Mar 13)
Lump Prepayments20%
Payment Increase20%
Double-up PaymentsNo
Permitted Loan-to-ValueUp to 95%
Pre-approvalsYes
Provider TypeCredit Union
Provinces ServedAB
Visit Provider

How to calculate mortgage payments

Want to figure out how much your monthly mortgage payment will be? For the mathematically inclined, here’s a formula to help you calculate mortgage payments manually:

Equation for mortgage payments

M = P[r(1+r)^n/((1+r)^n)-1)]

  • M = the total monthly mortgage payment.
  • P = the principal loan amount.
  • r = your monthly interest rate. Lenders provide you an annual rate so you’ll need to divide that figure by 12 (the number of months in a year) to get the monthly rate. If your interest rate is 5%, your monthly rate would be 0.004167 (0.05/12=0.004167)
  • n = number of payments over the loan’s lifetime. Multiply the number of years in your loan term by 12 (the number of months in a year) to get the number of payments for your loan. For example, a 30-year fixed mortgage would have 360 payments (30×12=360)

This formula can help you crunch the numbers to see how much house you can afford. Using comparedrates.ca’s tool to calculate your mortgage payments can take the work out of it for you and help you decide whether you’re putting enough money down or if you need to adjust your loan term. It’s always a good idea to rate-shop with several lenders to ensure you’re getting the best deal available.

How a mortgage calculator can help

Buying a home is often life’s largest financial transaction, and how you finance it shouldn’t be a snap decision. Setting a budget upfront — long before you look at homes — can help you avoid falling in love with a home you can’t afford. That’s where a simple mortgage calculator can help.

A mortgage payment includes four components called PITI: principal, interest, taxes and insurance. Many homebuyers know about these costs but what they’re not prepared for are the hidden costs of homeownership. These include homeowners association fees, private mortgage insurance, routine maintenance, larger utility bills and major repairs.

comparedrates.ca’s mortgage loan calculator can help you factor in PITI and HOA fees. You also can adjust your loan and down payment amounts, interest rate and loan term to see how much your payments might change. It’s important to know that your specific interest rate will depend on your overall credit profile and debt-to-income, or DTI, ratio (the sum of all of your debts and new mortgage payment divided by your gross monthly income). The riskier the borrower, the higher the interest rate in many cases.

Deciding how much house you can afford

If you’re not sure how much of your income should go toward housing, follow the tried-and-true 28/36 percent rule. Most financial advisers agree that people should spend no more than 28 percent of their gross income on housing (i.e. mortgage payment), and no more than 36 percent of their gross income on total debt, including mortgage payments, credit cards, student loans, medical bills and the like.

Here’s an example of what this looks like:

Joe makes $60,000 a year. That’s a gross monthly income of $5,000 a month.

$5,000 x 0.28 = $1,400 total monthly mortgage payment (PITI)

Joe’s total monthly mortgage payments — including principal, interest, taxes and insurance — shouldn’t exceed $1,400 per month. That’s a maximum loan amount of roughly $253,379.

You can qualify for a mortgage with a DTI ratio of up to 50 percent for some loans, but you might not have enough wiggle room in your budget for other living expenses, retirement and emergency savings, and discretionary spending. Lenders don’t take those budget items into account when they preapprove you for a loan; it’s up to you to factor those expenses into your housing affordability picture.

Depending on where you live, your annual income could be more than enough to cover a mortgage — or it could fall short. Knowing what you can afford can help you take financially sound next steps. The last thing you want to do is jump into a 30-year home loan that’s too expensive for your budget, even if a lender willing to loan you the money.

Next steps

A mortgage calculator is a springboard to helping you estimate your monthly mortgage payment and understand what it includes. Your next step after playing with the numbers: getting preapproved by a mortgage lender.

Applying for a mortgage will give you a more definitive idea of how much house you can afford after a lender has vetted your employment, income, credit and finances. You’ll also have a clearer idea of how much money you’ll need to bring to the closing table.

About our Mortgage Rate Tables

The above mortgage loan information is provided to, or obtained by, Comparedrates. Some lenders provide their mortgage loan terms to Comparedrates for advertising purposes and Comparedrates receives compensation from those advertisers (our “Advertisers”). Other lenders’ terms are gathered by Comparedrates through its own research of available mortgage loan terms and that information is displayed in our rate table for applicable criteria. In the above table, an Advertiser listing can be identified and distinguished from other listings because it includes a “Next” button that can be used to click-through to the Advertiser’s own website or a phone number for the Advertiser.

Each Advertiser is responsible for the accuracy and availability of its own advertised terms. Comparedrates cannot guaranty the accuracy or availability of any loan term shown above. However, Comparedrates attempts to verify the accuracy and availability of the advertised terms through its quality assurance process and requires Advertisers to agree to our Terms and Conditions and to adhere to our Quality Control Program. Click here for rate criteria by loan product.

Advertisers may have different loan terms on their own website from those advertised through comparedrates.ca. To receive the comparedrates.ca rate, you must identify yourself to the Advertiser as a comparedrates.ca customer. This will typically be done by phone so you should look for the Advertiser’s phone number when you click-through to their website. In addition, credit unions may require membership.

If you are seeking a loan for more than $424,100, lenders in certain locations may be able to provide terms that are different from those shown in the table above. You should confirm your terms with the lender for your requested loan amount.

The loan terms (APR and Payment examples) shown above do not include amounts for taxes or insurance premiums. Your monthly payment amount will be greater if taxes and insurance premiums are included.

If you have used comparedrates.ca and have not received the advertised loan terms or otherwise been dissatisfied with your experience with any Advertiser, we want to hear from you. Please click here to provide your comments to Comparedrates Quality Control.

Quality Assurance

Compare rates with confidence. Rates are accurate and available as of the date seen for Comparedrates customers. Identify yourself as a Comparedrates consumer to get the comparedrates.ca rate.

Mortgage Calculators: Alternative Use

Most people use a mortgage calculator to estimate the payment on a new mortgage, but it can be used for other purposes, too.
Here are some other uses:

  1. Planning to pay off your mortgage early.

    Use the “Extra payments” functionality of Comparedrates’s mortgage calculator to find out how you can shorten your term and net big savings by paying extra money toward your loan’s principal each month, every year or even just one time.

    To calculate the savings, click “Amortization / Payment Schedule” link and enter a hypothetical amount into one of the payment categories (monthly, yearly or one-time) and then click “Apply Extra Payments” to see how much interest you”ll end up paying and your new payoff date.

  2. Decide if an ARM is worth the risk.

    The lower initial interest rate of an adjustable-rate mortgage, or ARM, can be tempting. But while an ARM may be appropriate for some borrowers, others may find that the lower initial interest rate won’t cut their monthly payments as much as they think.

    To get an idea of how much you’ll really save initially, try entering the ARM interest rate into the mortgage calculator, leaving the term as 30 years. Then, compare those payments to the payments you get when you enter the rate for a conventional 30-year fixed mortgage. Doing so may confirm your initial hopes about the benefits of an ARM — or give you a reality check about whether the potential plusses of an ARM really outweigh the risks.

  3. Find out when to get rid of private mortgage insurance.

    You can use the mortgage calculator to determine when you”ll have 20 percent equity in your home. This percentage is the magic number for requesting that a lender wave private mortgage insurance requirement.

    Simply enter in the original amount of your mortgage and the date you closed, and click “Show Amortization Schedule.” Then, multiply your original mortgage amount by 0.8 and match the result to the closest number on the far-right column of the amortization table to find out when you’ll reach 20 percent equity.

Mortgage Calculator Help

Using an online mortgage calculator can help you quickly and accurately predict your monthly mortgage payment with just a few pieces of information. It can also show you the total amount of interest you”ll pay over the life of your mortgage. To use this calculator, you”ll need the following information:
Home price – The dollar amount you expect to pay for a home.

Down payment – The down payment is money you give to the home’s seller. At least 20% down typically lets you avoid mortgage insurance.

Mortgage Amount – If you’re getting a mortgage to buy a new home, you can find this number by subtracting your down payment from the home’s price. If you’re refinancing, this number will be the outstanding balance on your mortgage.

Mortgage Term (Years) – This is the length of the mortgage you’re considering. For example, if you’re buying new, you may choose a mortgage loan that lasts 30 years. On the other hand, a homeowner who is refinancing may opt of a loan that lasts 15 years.

Interest Rate – Estimate the interest rate on a new mortgage by checking Comparedrates’s mortgage rate tables for your area. Once you have a projected rate (your real-life rate may be different depending on your overall credit picture) you can plug it into the calculator.

Mortgage Start Date – Select the month, day and year when your mortgage payments will